NEUROSCIENCE "IN THE ZONE" THE "ZEN ZONE!"

NEUROSCIENCE IS “IN THE ZONE!” … SEE WHY “ACTION MEDITATIONS” WORK BEST FOR 80% OF MEN&WOMEN … FOUR-OF-FIVE! … 258,000,000 OF ALL AMERICANS!!

YES, NEUROSCIENCE IS “IN THE ZONE!”
ACTION MEDITATIONS DO WORK BEST
FOR 258,000,000 OF ALL AMERICANS
80% OF MEN & WOMEN!
Ask anyone in the business of stress management and they’ll tell you that meditation is the best tool available in reducing stress, the number one health problem in Corporate America today. Stress drains $300 billion from the economy every year, in absenteeism, lower productivity, increased healthcare costs, a huge loss of talent. In fact, experts tell us 60-90 percent of all doctors’ visits are the result of stress-related medical conditions, and meditation will reduce our stress.
So what’s the problem? Sitting meditation—it doesn’t work for most of today’s busy Americans. And yet, sitting meditation techniques are the ones most frequently used in stress management. That’s right, even though sitting meditation is not the best method of meditating for most people, it remains the favorite of gurus and the one most frequently spotlighted in the media.
SITTING DOESN’T WORK FOR 80% OF AMERICANS
THEY NEED NEW MEDITATIONS-IN-ACTION!
More specifically: In our research for the ‘Millionaire Code,’ a study of the wealth-building styles of the sixteen different personality types, it became quite apparent that sitting meditation works best for only about 20 percent of American population. Conversely, sitting is not the best way for the other 80 percent. Their personality types are more naturally suited to action-oriented meditations, rather than passive methods relying on mental techniques.
What does this mean for you? Simply this: The odds are high—four out of five—that sitting meditation is not the best way for you, and you need another kind of meditation if you want the benefits; stress reduction, physical health, increased energy, higher productivity, and success on the bottom line.
My guess is that you probably already know all this. You’ve already tried sitting meditation on the advice of a friend, a therapist, or after reading about it in the news. You tried but you gave it up, telling yourself that you just don’t have the time, or it is just too darn boring, or you hate all that sitting. But I would also bet the real reason is that sitting meditation doesn’t fit your personality type, and as a result, it just isn’t the best way for you to meditate.
NEW STRESS MANAGEMENT CLUB
FOR TODAY’S BUSY AMERICANS
So join the club. There are millions like you, all searching for a way to meditate that fits their personality type and lifestyle, but most of all, feels right personally. Picking the right one is actually easy and simple, if you use the four simple rules outlined in this training manual.
This simple approach is different from any other meditation program you’ve ever read about or tried. There is no one-size-fits-all method you must do without fail, quite the opposite. While this approach uses elements common to ancient and contemporary meditation methods, the main goal is to help you find a new way of meditating that is uniquely your way.

 

About the author

Paul Farrell

Dr. Farrell is a Behavioral Economist. His books include The Millionaire Code; The Millionaire Meditation: Stress Management for Wall Street, Corporate America & Entrepreneurs; The Zen Millionaire; The Winning Portfolio; Expert Investing on The Net; Mutual Funds on The Net; and The Lazy Person's Guide to Investing. He also published 1,643 columns on DowJones-MarketWatch and for years was their #1 traffic-generating columnist. Before the Internet, he edited & published FNX: Future News Index, a financial newsletter for stock market traders. Earlier he was a Wall Street investment banker with Morgan Stanley, Executive Vice President of the Financial News Network; and Associate Editor of the Los Angeles Herald Examiner. He has a Doctorate in Psychology, Juris Doctor, Masters in Regional Planning and Bachelor of Architecture. He worked on the Esalen organic farm and served in the U.S. Marine Corps as Staff Sergeant in aviation computer technology.

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